Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
. since 1962, the state has been highly centralized. the state to maintain control of everything in syria even if you permit to apply for a open a store. you have to check first with security forces. people in syria have to do this very well with almost no funding or very little funding. they also have to operate in abnormal circumstances. there is aleppo the city and also the periphery. they make up the province. all of the periphery has been liberated. when i was in aleppo i missed the hustle and bustle of the city. the first thing i did their was i was hosted by the revolutionary transition. they come together into what they can to fill this void. we took a tour of the city. most of the shops where closed down. some were not. i wanted to find out that was trying to function as a transitional government structure. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
. >>> the deadly violence goes on in syria. and today bashar al assad's forces are claiming they attacked several rebel operations in the eastern city of aszohr. meanwhile, russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria met in moscow and they are calling for a syrian-led political transition. they warn the conflict is becoming more militarized and sectarian. >> the conflict is not only more and more militarized, it is also more and more sectarian. and if we are not careful, if the syrians themselves are not careful, it will be a mainly sectarian conflict with really dire consequences for the people of syria. >> the meeting appears to signal a shift in position by russia. so far moscow has opposed efforts by the u.n. security council to oust syrian president who has been a longtime ally. >>> meanwhile, a member of russia's parliament is trying to reverse part of a controversial law banning all adoptions by americans. the state-run news agency says the lawmaker is submitting an amendment that would allow americans to adopt children with disabilities. but the u.s. is hoping for a total rever
and explosions and death in syria. this is damascus. at least five people were killed today when a powerful car bomb blew up in this residential neighborhood. it tore apart apartment buildings and filled the streets with debris. government blames rebel fighters for setting off the bomb. at least 30 people died in attacks across syria today. half of them in damascus. >>> this is new delhi, india. riot police blasting protesters with high-pressure water hoses trying to break up a rally against the government. people are furious after a woman was reportedly gang raped last weekend. women are not safe in new dehli and other cities in india. >>> it's one of our top stories this hour on cnn. a former u.s. marine and war veteran is released from a mexican prison. he spent four months there without a trial on a questionable gun charge. he describes conditions there and his treatment as deplorable. another american family is desperately trying to bring home steven knight, an american who has been in a mexican prison more than a year. cnn's rafael romo has his story. >> reporter: this is what steven knig
changed? i just came from a long trip, russia, syria, israel, egypt. here's what happens in what i call a hyperconnected world when you're a columnist now. when i started, i was a reporter in beirut in 1982. all i wanted to do was tell americans something they didn't know from beirut, okay? well, that was pretty easy because, you know, there was no cnn back then. you couldn't really follow the news. there were no bloggers. now when i go abroad to write a column, i just wrote from egypt this morning, what's in my head is i'm not looking to tell just americans something they don't know about egypt, still pretty easy. what i aspire to now is actually to tell egyptians something they don't know about their own country. in other words, my job has changed because i know i have readers there. i have bloggers there. i'm so connected to that audience that it isn't enough for me anymore in the old days just to tell people in chicago something new about egypt. i've now got to tell people in egypt something new about egypt if i want to keep my job. >> exactly. and we ask these questions and make th
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
with humanitarian aid, and working for a transition to a syria that is free of the regime. today, i want to make it absolutely clear to assad the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is an would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. [applause] we simply cannot allow the 26 -- the 21st century to the darkened by the weapons of the 20th century. over the last four years, we make critical investments in our production programs. energy, state, and we have been increasing funding and sustaining it. even as we make some very tough fiscal choices, we will keep investing in these programs. our national security depends on it. after all, even with all of your success, the thousands of missiles destroyed, bombers and submarines eliminated, the warheads deactivated, we are nowhere near done. by a long shot. you all know this. there is still much too much material. being stored without enough protection. there are still terrorists and criminal gangs doing everything they can to get their hands on
on in this piece in "usa today" -- harder choices loom. syria being a more intractable problem than libya. a tougher stance with china through the a share rebalancing . is now the time to me sure a firmer line does not lead to another war. writer a lot that the lays out in his piece. grace from alabama, good morning. caller: good morning. i have a question about benghazi. nobody has said anything like this. it seems to me, the president would get on the phone with the president of the other country and say, "please help us save our people." the in the u.s. help support the efforts of the people to get rid of gaddafi? why did obama or hillary clinton get on the phone and call the president of libya and say, "you owe us. san whenever you have to save our people." i believe the local forces went in after it was over and our people were dead. to didn't somebody jawbone, get them in there to help? host: you can talk about any topic you like. joel florida, what is on your mind. caller: you were talking about afghanistan. one of the main reasons we are over there is to keep the poppy plants grow
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10